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Apollo 12 Flown Kapton Foil & Moon Rock Acrylic

Apollo 12 Command Module Flown Kapton Foil & NWA 10203 Moon Rock Mini Lucite.

Encapsulated inside a small (4.75 x 2.75 inch) acrylic

Comes with COA booklet and presentation box

PRICE - $295

Apollo 12 Flown Kapton Foil: The flown material contained within this lucite is Kapton Foil taken from the Apollo 12 Command Module 'Yankee Clipper' after its return to Earth. Kapton Foil, silver-coloured on the front with a gold backing, was attached to the outside skin of the Columbia in order to protect the fragile craft from the extreme environment of deep space. Because the foil was attached to the outside skin of the Columbia, its silver-coloured side was directly exposed to deep space.

NWA 10203 Moon Rock: The moon is constantly hit by meteorites and with no atmosphere and little gravity the larger impacts eject lunar rocks into space. After this impact, this meteorite will eventually be brought down to Earth by the Earth's gravitational pull. Scientists and universities all around the world examine meteorites and compare them with known lunar material, e.g. samples collected during the Apollo missions. The composition of gases and isotopes found is so unique that they can say for sure the material originated from the moon. The encased meteorite was acquired from Meteorite Hunter and Discovery Channel's ''Meteorite Men'' T.V. Star, Steve Arnold.

About Your Lucite:

  • Overall Acrylic is 12cm x 7cm x 3cm

  • Encased Kapton Foil is approx. 8mm x 6mm x 6mm

  • Encased Moon Rock is approx. 50-100mg

  • Comes in a wonderful black box bearing the Apollo Program Insignia

  • Comes with an 8 page booklet containing details of Authenticity, Images & Descriptions of Apollo 12

    Apollo 12 was the sixth manned flight in the United States Apollo program and the second to land on the Moon (an H type mission). It was launched on November 14, 1969, from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, four months after Apollo 11. Mission commander Charles "Pete" Conrad and Lunar Module Pilot Alan L. Bean performed just over one day and seven hours of lunar surface activity while Command Module Pilot Richard F. Gordon remained in lunar orbit. The landing site for the mission was located in the southeastern portion of the Ocean of Storms.

    Unlike the first landing on Apollo 11, Conrad and Bean achieved a precise landing at their expected location, the site of the Surveyor 3 unmanned probe, which had landed on April 20, 1967. They carried the first color television camera to the lunar surface on an Apollo flight, but transmission was lost after Bean accidentally destroyed the camera by pointing it at the Sun. On one of two moonwalks, they visited the Surveyor and removed some parts for return to Earth. The mission ended on November 24 with a successful splashdown.

    Please note these acrylics are smaller than our Apollo 12 and Apollo 16 Moonpans Acrylics

    Price: $295
    Rear Side




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